Summer Sessions
 

2017 Summer Session Course Descriptions

Use the links below to jump to course descriptions for your desired Summer Session.

Summer Session 1: May 30 - June 30, 2017

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

AR-111 • Basic Ceramics • 4 • Lauren Sandler • Lab Fee $75
Basic issues of aesthetics and technique developed through the direct manipulation of clay. A variety of forming techniques will be explored and demonstrated, including pinching, coiling, slab constructing, and throwing. In addition to group and individual critiques, weekly lectures will provide a working knowledge of kiln firing (both gas and electric) and clay and glaze formulation. 

AR-209 • Communication Design I • 4 • Joe Klockowski  • Lab Fee $105
An introduction to visual design and communication theory. Emphasis is on developing a strong foundation in visual perception, design principles, and typography. Students will undertake studio problems aimed at developing visual awareness, analytical thinking, craftsmanship, and use of hands-on media and digital techniques. Note(s):Prerequisites:AR-133, AR-136 or AR-134.

AR-217 • Intermediate Ceramics • 4 • Lauren Sandler • Lab Fee $100
The continued development of aesthetic concepts and techniques. Individual exploration and expression will be encouraged. Through a structured approach with demonstrations, lectures, weekly assignments, and group and individual critiques, the student will be exposed to hand-building and throwing, as well as raku, salt-glazing, and stoneware reduction techniques. Note(s):Prerequisites: AR-111 or permission of instructor.

AR-264I • Bronzecasting • John Galt • Lab Fee $250
(Lab fee does not include the cost of bronze, wax or other miscellaneous supplies)
A five-week course in fine arts bronze casting. Students are taught basic foundry practices including rubber molding, wax-work, gating and shelling. (Other technologies presented are TIG welding, chasing and patina.) No casting experience is necessary but students must have significant experience in sculpture beyond the foundation level.  Acceptance into the program is dependent upon instructor’s approval.

AR-264I • Digital Sculpture Studio • John Galt • Lab Fee $75
CNC Processes and Sculpturecourse. The goal of the course is for students to become confident at using digital means to define and solve problems in three dimensions.  Students develop technical skills related to metal processes and become increasingly more visually sophisticated as they create, observe, evaluate and then share the consequences of their efforts.  CAD (Computer Aided Design) technology is used to create metal shapes that are cut out with a CNC plasma cutter, assembled, and then welded together. A basic working knowledge of software like Adobe Acrobat, Corel Draw, Sketchup or other CAD programs is helpful but not a requirement.  Advanced students are encouraged to use Autodesk Inventor.  Students are expected to have their own laptop.  Studio Fee: $75. No Prerequisites.

AR-318 • Advanced Ceramics • 4 • Lauren Sandler • Lab Fee $100 includes clay, glazes, and firings
A further intensification of the use of clay as a medium and a continuation of the development of the forming processes of hand-building and throwing. Also included will be the formulation of clay bodies and the investigation of kiln firing techniques. Prerequisites: AR-217.

AR-351I • Bronzecasting • 4 • John Galt • Lab Fee $250
Lab fee does not include the cost of bronze, wax or other miscellaneous supplies.
A five-week course in fine arts bronze casting. Students are taught basic foundry practices including rubber molding, wax-work, gating and shelling. (Other technologies presented are TIG welding, chasing and patina.) No casting experience is necessary but students must have significant experience in sculpture beyond the foundation level.  Acceptance into the program is dependent upon instructor’s approval.

BI-110 • Biology of the Mind • 4 • Jennifer Bonner • Lab fee $80
An introductory-level examination of the basic neurobiology of the human brain and nervous system. A sufficient depth of biological perspective is developed to allow the student to consider the neurobiological underpinnings of a wide variety of brain-related topics including pathology (select mental and nervous system diseases), socially significant issues (drugs, alcohol), higher function (language, sleep, memory, consciousness), and philosophical issues (mind-body problem, artificial intelligence, ethical issues). Note(s): (Fulfills natural sciences and QR2 requirements.)

CH-115 • Fundamentals of Chemistry • 4 • Beatrice Kendall
An Introductory course for students with little to no background in chemistry. Fundamental chemical concepts such as atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, and the properties of solids, liquids, and gases are presented.  Emphasis is placed on learning the “language of chemistry,” achieving the ability to visualize and understand process on an atomic and molecular level, and developing problem solving skills. Laboratory exercises and experiments serve to illustrate concepts presented in the lecture. This course is appropriate for students preparing to take Chemistry 125-Principles of Chemistry and for students who seek a one-semester survey of the subject. Note(s): May not be used to satisfy major or minor requirements in chemistry or biology. (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.) Prerequisites: QR1 and placement based on an online diagnostic exam.

CS-106 • Introduction to Computer Science I • 4 • Michael Eckmann
An introduction to the principles of design, implementation, and testing of object-oriented programs. The course covers language features such as control structures, classes, file I/0, and basic data structures including arrays. Other topics include recursion and fundamental algorithms, such as elementary searching and sorting algorithms.  May not be taken for credit by students who have taken or are currently taking CS-107 or CS-206. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement.)

DS-202 • Podcasting Workshop • 1 • Eileen McAdam
In the podcasting workshop, students will engage in exploration of podcasting storytelling and metrics, production and influence on the future of radio, participate in a field trip to explore and practice using different microphones, and work with archival sound to create relevant stories. (Must enroll in DS 251C Intro to Audio Documentary)

DS-251C • Intro to Audio Documentary • 3 • Eileen McAdam
An introduction to the technologies, tools, and skills of creating audio documentaries.  Working individually in small production teams, students will produce original sound works for radio broadcast and podcast and listen to and critically analyze examples in the medium.  Students will also learn to research and report a story according to ethical guidelines and legal norms of permissions as they apply different methods of sculpting an audio experience, telling stories, and representing reality.  The course assumes no prior knowledge of audio technologies. (Must enroll in DS 202 Podcasting Workshop) 

DS-251C • The Documentary Film Business• 3 • Yvonne Welbon
In this introductory course, students learn about the documentary film business from development through distribution.  Through case studies, readings, screenings, discussion, special guests and hands-on work on non-fiction projects currently in productions, students learn the basics of producing an independent documentary film.

DS-251C • Introduction to Documentary Filmmaking • 3 • Jonna McKone
Documentary Production focuses on the critical and technical skills that support the production of non-fiction video.  The course will focus on work in the small towns and cities of the Hudson River Valley, which are layered with history.  Exploring the region around Skidmore as a field site, students will gather impressions in various media to create short films that engage with the archaeological, visual, and experiential qualities of place.  The course will include screenings and critiques of documentary, experimental and essay films that examine geographies through unconventional modes. As part of the production component of the class, students will learn editing, filming and sound recording.  Class time will be used for technical workshops, critiques, screenings and discussions.  Throughout the session, students will propose, shoot, edit and present a short documentary video.

EC-104 • Intro to Microeconomics • 4 • Severin Carlson
An introduction to the study of markets. The course develops the basic economic model of supply and demand to illustrate how choices regarding the production and distribution of goods and services are made by firms and households in a market economy. The course also examines the possibility of market failure and the appropriate government response. Policy topics may include poverty and homelessness, health care, the environment, antitrust, discrimination, international trade, unions, and minimum wage laws. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 and social sciences requirements.) Prerequisites: QR1.

EN-211 • Fiction • 3 • Paul Benzon
What does it mean to write a story? What does it mean to read one? Beyond just telling a good story or entertaining us, how and why do authors use written narratives to produce certain effects? This course is designed to give you an introduction to reading fiction thoughtfully and critically. In order to develop these skills, we will focus closely on a small number of texts, discussing and writing about them carefully. We’ll spend time thinking about how each text produces certain impressions and ideas, as well as the bigger questions of what fiction is and what we do when we read it and write about it. To give our discussions a common thread throughout the course, we will focus on texts that address the relation between humanity and monstrosity. We’ll think about how these texts represent the monstrous, what role the monstrous has in raising social and cultural issues, and what relations there are between monstrosity and the art of fiction itself. Readings may include short stories by Edgar Allen Poe, Franz Kafka, Henry James, and Edith Wharton and novels including Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl. We’ll also consider a range of other material (film, music, digital texts, etc.) in order to give further context to our reading and thinking. Note(s):  Required for EN-281 Introduction to Fiction Writing. Recommended preparation for advanced courses in fiction. (Fulfills humanities requirement.)

EX-115 • Kinetic Anatomy – The Moving Body • 4 • Karen Arciero and Sarah DePasquale
An introduction to the principles of functional anatomy. Students will explore the muscles enabling human movement. Geared to students interested in careers in the health professions, this course covers physiology, gross anatomy, and biomechanics. Note(s): (Fulfills natural sciences requirement.)

GE-101 • Earth Systems Science • 4 • Kyle Nichols • Lab fee $50
An introduction to Earth’s dynamic systems and geologic processes. The planet is studied from its deep interior to its oceanic, surficial, and atmospheric components to develop a scientific understanding of Earth as a holistic environmental system, of which the biosphere, including humanity, is one component. Within this context, course topics such as rocks and minerals, mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers, surface and groundwater, and resources are examined from the perspective of the interactions between geologic processes and humans. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement; qualifies as a natural science laboratory course for breadth requirement.) Prerequisites: QR1

GE-211 • Climatology • 4 • Amy Frappier  
Introduction to the basic components of Earth’s climate system: the atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. The course investigates the basic physical processes that determine climate and the links among the components of the climate system, including the hydrologic and carbon cycles and their roles in climate, climate stability, and global change. Topics also include climate patterns and forecasting climate, as well as their applications and human impacts.  Note(s): (Fulfills natural sciences requirement.)  Counts for natural science credit, and towards the majors and/or minors in Geosciences, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, and International Affairs.

GW-101 • Intro to Gender Studies • 4 • Kolbe Franklin
An introduction to the origins, purpose, subject matters, and methods of the interdisciplinary study of gender. Students are expected to expand their knowledge of the relative historical and present social conditions of women and men in different contexts and to develop analytical skills for the examination of socially significant variables-race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. Students will explore different and often opposing understandings of what constitutes feminism and feminist action. The class format will combine interactive lectures, reading assignments, discussion, formal research and writing assignments and other student projects. Ideally, students will leave the class with an understanding of how gender structures cultural, political, economic, and social relations in various contexts.

HF-215 • Peer Health Education • 3 • Jennifer McDonald
Course provides training necessary for students to work as Peer Health Educators. Covers the concepts, principles, theory, and practice of health education, health promotion, and peer-based education. Students engage with a variety of topics surrounding health, wellness, community health promotion, theories of behavioral change and leadership skill building through readings, class discussions, and opportunities for experiential learning. Throughout the semester, students research, plan, execute and evaluate educational outreach materials and programs on various health and wellness topics relevant to college-aged students. Requires application and instructor approval: (https://www.skidmore.edu/health_promotion/peer/applicationform.php).

HI-144P • East Asian Civilization • 4 • Jenny Day
An introductory survey of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea) from its earliest history to the end of the Mongol empire in the 1300s. Students will explore the formation of Confucianism as an ideology, the changes in social and political institutions across East Asia, ideas and practices concerning gender and the family, religion and beliefs of elites and ordinary people, and intercultural exchanges and conflicts within East Asia. Note(s): (Designated a non-Western culture course; fulfills social sciences requirement.)

MA-111 • Calculus I • 4 • David Vella
Derivatives, integrals and their applications. Techniques of differentiation. Integration and differentiation of exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement.) Prerequisites: High school preparation including trigonometry.

MB-214 • Foundations of Marketing • 3 • Azita Hirsa
A comprehensive assessment of marketing’s dynamic role in contemporary global society. The course emphasizes the development of marketing strategies which reflect domestic and cross-national competitive structures and diverse marketplace realities. Topics include consumer analyses, target market identification, positioning, e-commerce, ethics, sustainability, and coordination of marketing mix-elements.  This course covers the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, III, V. Prerequisites:MB-107.

MB-224 • Organizational Behavior • 3 • Azita Hirsa
The study of human behavior in the organizational context. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of topics in the area of organizational behavior through three levels of analysis (individual, group, and organizational). Topics covered include personality, perception, decision making, motivation, team work, conflict, negotiation, leadership, organizational structure, and organizational culture. This course incorporates the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, II, III, IV, V, VI. Coverage of the dimensions may vary per instructor. Prerequisites: MB-107.

MB-333 • Business Law I • 3 • Scott Mulligan
A study of the origin of laws, philosophy of law and related ethical issues, and the court system and its legal procedures with emphasis on their impact in business and economic situations. Specific topics, which will be studied using a modified Socratic method and examination and briefing of case law, include contracts, agency, LLCs, corporations and partnerships. This course covers the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, VI.

MF-251C • Time: A Seminar • 3 • Peter Rose  
This course will consider the concept of Time from a multidisciplinary perspective, drawing on readings in philosophy, literature, psychology, sociology, and film theory.  Relevant works in film and video will be screened.  “Time” is a fundamental component of the grand metaphysic undergirding our understanding of the world, and yet it is perhaps the most elusive.  Scientists, philosophers, neurologists, sociologists and politicians all approach the topic from somewhat contradictory perspectives. AND WE WILL CIRCUMNAVIGATE THE TOPIC FROM ALL THESE PERSPECTIVES.

MF-251C • Drawing Identity in Comics • 3 • Gregory Spinner
This course offers close and critical readings of recent novels, memoirs, and journalism produced in the medium of comics. Combining words and pictures to powerfully convey human experience, comics challenge us to look at the world differently. Engaging ideas and images from a variety of canons, both religious and secular, we will ask how the stories we tell shape our identities. Reading works that illuminate significant passages in personal development (awakening to love, leaving home, losing faith), as well as ones dealing with highly traumatic events (including genocide), we not only deal with coming of age, but begin our coming to terms with the profound unpleasantness of history. 

MF-251D • Human Culture Communication • 4 • Aaron Pedinotti 
This course examines major theories, concepts, and research perspectives pertinent to the study of culture and human communication. It introduces and reviews key approaches to the study of human interaction, rhetoric, language, persuasion, and cultural processes across diverse contexts.  Student in this class will explore interdisciplinary topics, examining the role of language in shaping perceptions of meaning and reality; the nonverbal aspects of social interaction; and the processes and meanings of interaction in varied contexts, including interpersonal communication, small groups, and organizations. The course provides a framework for students to think seriously about how culture and society are constructed in and through our communicative practices. In doing so, it examines the social, cultural, and political impacts of communication as it unfolds in everyday life. By the end of the course, students will have developed the critical tools to consider the role of communication in contemporary society and begin to establish their own perspectives on the study of human communication.   

MF-351C • Time: A Seminar • 3 • Peter Rose
This course will consider the concept of Time from a multidisciplinary perspective, drawing on readings in philosophy, literature, psychology, sociology, and film theory.  Relevant works in film and video will be screened.  “Time” is a fundamental component of the grand metaphysic undergirding our understanding of the world, and yet it is perhaps the most elusive.  Scientists, philosophers, neurologists, sociologists and politicians all approach the topic from somewhat contradictory perspectives. AND WE WILL CIRCUMNAVIGATE THE TOPIC FROM ALL THESE PERSPECTIVES.

PH-101 • Introduction to Philosophy • 3 • Peter Murray
This course is a topical and historical introduction to the discipline and practice of philosophy. Through analysis of texts, discussion, participation, and lecture, the student will gain an understanding of philosophy both as a unique discipline that investigates some of the most profound questions about ourselves and the world, and as a practice that illuminates our scientific, social, and individual existences. Questions of particular interest in this course include: What is knowledge? What can we know about ourselves? What, if anything, can we know about the world outside ourselves? What are minds, and what is it to have a mind? Can a computer have a mind? Do human beings possess a free will, and can they be morally responsible if they do not? What actions are moral? Are there objective moral truths? How do we know what is right, and what sort of reasoning should we use to establish what is right? Note(s): Open to first- and second-year students or by permission of instructor. (Fulfills humanities requirement.)

PH-207 • Introduction to Logic • 3 • Peter Murray
An introduction to the basic concepts and methods of modern symbolic logic, with a focus on their application to proper reasoning. Students learn how to represent sentences in logical notation, to reconstruct arguments in that notation, to assess arguments for validity and soundness, and to prove conclusions from premises using a system of natural deduction. Students also learn to recognize common argument forms and common mistakes in reasoning (fallacies), are introduced to philosophical issues related to logic, and learn how symbolic logic is the basis for the digital computer. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement.)

PY-207 • General Physics I  with Lab • 4 • Jill Linz
A calculus-based introduction to the concepts and principles of mechanics, emphasizing translational and rotational kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, conservation laws, and gravitation. Hands-on exploration of physical systems using computer interfaced laboratory equipment and spreadsheet modeling techniques are used to elucidate physical principles. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.) Prerequisites: QR1. Corequisite:MA-111.

RE-230 • Drawing Identity in Comics • 3 • Gregory Spinner
This course offers close and critical readings of recent novels, memoirs, and journalism produced in the medium of comics. Combining words and pictures to powerfully convey human experience, comics challenge us to look at the world differently. Engaging ideas and images from a variety of canons, both religious and secular, we will ask how the stories we tell shape our identities. Reading works that illuminate significant passages in personal development (awakening to love, leaving home, losing faith), as well as ones dealing with highly traumatic events (including genocide), we not only deal with coming of age, but begin our coming to terms with the profound unpleasantness of history. Note(s):.(Fulfills humanities requirement.)

SO-229R • Visual Sociology • 4 • Rik Scarce
An introduction to visual sociology as both an analytical tool for more deeply understanding the visual in society and as a means of conveying the results of sociological research. Students will develop the theoretical and conceptual tools necessary to ask more critical questions of the visual world around them and, by producing a sociological documentary of their own, the technical skills to communicate in visual media. No prior experience with videography is required. Students are strongly encouraged to have taken at least one Sociology course beyond the gateway class. Note(s):Prerequisites: One sociology gateway course (SO-101, SO-201, SO-202, SO-203, or SO-204).

WLF-101 • Elementary French I • 4 • Cynthia Evans 
An introduction to spoken and written French emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the cultures of France and the Francophone world. Note(s): Presupposes no previous study of French.

WLI-101 • Elementary Italian I • 4 • Barbara Garbin
An introduction to spoken and written Italian emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the culture of Italy. Note(s): Presupposes no previous study of Italian.

WLS-101 • Elementary Spanish I • 4 • Diana Barnes
An introduction to spoken and written Spanish emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the cultures of Spain and Spanish America. Note(s): Presupposes no previous study of Spanish. Instructor approval required.

WLS-103 • Alternative Second Semester of Spanish • 3 • Beatriz Loyola
An introduction and review of elementary spoken and written Spanish emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the cultures of Spain and Spanish America. Note(s): For students who have completed one or two years of pre-college Spanish, and who have not placed in FS 203 or above. Not open to students who have completed FS 101. Instructor approval required.

 

 

Summer Session 2: July 3 – August 7, 2017

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

AR-101 • Intro to Painting • 3 • Jeffrey Fichera • Lab Fee $60
An introduction to painting as a medium of visual expression. Emphasis is placed upon exploration of formal and technical concerns. Basic studies include drawing and will explore a variety of subject matter and media directed toward the organization of the two-dimensional plane. Note(s): Summer only. Not open to Skidmore art majors.

AR-101Z • Intro to Painting Workshop • 0 • Jeffrey Fichera • Lab Fee $60
An introduction to painting as a medium of visual expression. Emphasis is placed upon exploration of formal and technical concerns. Basic studies include drawing and will explore a variety of subject matter and media directed toward the organization of the two-dimensional plane. Note(s): Summer only. Not open to Skidmore art majors.

AR-133 • Drawing • 4 • Kathy Hemingway-Jones • Lab Fee $50
This course builds on basic drawing experiences, refining skills in observation, organization, interpretation, and critical analysis. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and materials while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression.

AR-133Z • Drawing Workshop • 0 • Kathy Hemingway-Jones • Lab Fee $50
This course builds on basic drawing experiences, refining skills in observation, organization, interpretation, and critical analysis. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and materials while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression.

AR-264H • Paper Print Press • 4 • Terry Conrad • Lab Fee $100
Starting with the creation of their printing papers students will explore different traditional paper making and printmaking techniques. Both Nepalese style and Western style, paper-making will be taught along with relief, chine colle, and letterpress printing techniques. This course will have the student consider the image they make, as well as the surface it sits on, the paper. While the skills are traditional, the ideas explored for the projects completed in class will be contemporary. Note(s): This course is designed to meet 200-level requirements, and are open to students who have fulfilled the appropriate prerequisites. This course may be repeated once for credit provided that the topic is in a different discipline. No Prerequisites.

AR-264Z • Paper Print Press Workshop • 0 • Terry Conrad • Lab Fee $100
Starting with the creation of their printing papers students will explore different traditional paper making and printmaking techniques. Both Nepalese style and Western style, paper-making will be taught along with relief, chine colle, and letterpress printing techniques. This course will have the student consider the image they make, as well as the surface it sits on, the paper. While the skills are traditional, the ideas explored for the projects completed in class will be contemporary. Note(s): This course is designed to meet 200-level requirements, and are open to students who have fulfilled the appropriate prerequisites. This course may be repeated once for credit provided that the topic is in a different discipline. No Prerequisites.

AR-264I • Casting • 4 • John Galt • Lab Fee $100
An intensive five-week course in theory and practice of casting sculpture. Traditional methods for molding and casting sculpture are covered: plaster and rubber molds for wax, clay slip, plaster, metal and other materials are covered. Mold making for metal casting is addressed and may include plaster investment, greensand, ceramic shell and baked clay. Students focus on small-scale sculpture in order to cover major casting materials and processes. Finished works may include sculpture in plaster, wax, bronze, iron and aluminum. Slide lectures and field trips dealing with contemporary and traditional methods of casting provide context for studio experience. No Prerequisites.

AR-264Z • Casting Workshop • 0 • John Galt • Lab Fee $100
An intensive five-week course in theory and practice of casting sculpture. Traditional methods for molding and casting sculpture are covered: plaster and rubber molds for wax, clay slip, plaster, metal and other materials are covered. Mold making for metal casting is addressed and may include plaster investment, greensand, ceramic shell and baked clay. Students focus on small-scale sculpture in order to cover major casting materials and processes. Finished works may include sculpture in plaster, wax, bronze, iron and aluminum. Slide lectures and field trips dealing with contemporary and traditional methods of casting provide context for studio experience. No Prerequisites.

BI-170 • Human Genetics • 4 • Bernard Possidente • Lab fee $80
An introduction to the principles of genetics and their application to human biology. Topics include the history of genetics; the structure, function, and inheritance of genes; medical genetics; and genetic engineering. Note(s): (Fulfills natural sciences and QR2 requirements.)

CS-206 • Introduction to Computer Science II • 4 • Thomas O’Connell
Fundamentals of software development and algorithm design. Topics include recursion, data structures, analysis of algorithms, and program verification. Prerequisites:CS-106 or CS-107 or permission of instructor.

DS-251D • Storytelling for the Screen • 4 • Nicole Coady
Students will learn the classic three-act structure for telling their visual story.  They will learn how to craft a compelling log line, as well as create a skeleton treatment from which to build their story and then go on to complete a first draft of a feature length screenplay which can be shared with other participants in the often collaborative work of telling stories through the various visual mediums available to 21st century storytellers.

EN-103 • Writing Seminar I • 4 • Paul Fogle
Introduction to expository writing with weekly writing assignments emphasizing skills in developing ideas, organizing material, and creating thesis statements. Assignments provide practice in description, definition, comparison and contrast, and argumentation. Additional focus on grammar, syntax, and usage. Note(s): This course does not fulfill the all-college requirement in expository writing.

EN-105 • Writing Seminar II • 4 •  François Bonneville, Thaddeus Niles
This seminar immerses students in the process of producing finished analytical essays informed by critical reading and careful reasoning. Special attention is given to developing ideas, writing from sources, organizing material, and revising drafts. Additional emphasis is on grammar, style, and formal conventions of writing. Students respond to one another’s work in workshops or peer critique sessions. Note(s): This course fulfills the all-college requirement in expository writing.

EX-111 ● Intro to Exercise Science ● 4 ● Sarah Herrick
An introduction to the scientific basis of physical activity. Emphasis is placed upon the study of the physiological change and adaptations that occur as a result of the stress of exercise. Students will be active participants in laboratory experiments that examine the body’s response to exercise. Note(s): (Fulfills natural sciences requirement.)

MF-220 • Intro to Media Studies • 4 • Aaron Pedinotti
An interdisciplinary introduction to the questions re: Human dilemmas in the context of an increasingly technology and media saturated culture. The course begins with close consideration of the nature and structure of human communication and an historical overview of communications and media. Students will study media from both psychological and societal perspectives and will consider the impact of media on politics, government, community, and consumer behavior. Special attention will be paid throughout the course to the personal and social impact of current and emerging forms of communication and media.

PY-109 • Physics: Sound and Music • 4 • Jill Linz
The physical principles of sound-how it is produced, propagated, and perceived. Illumination of principles will emphasize examples from music. Mechanisms used to produce different types of musical sounds will be discussed as well as the physical principles behind the reproduction of music in its many forms such as radio, tape recorders, and CD players. The laboratory component will include measurement of the speed of sound, frequency analysis of musical instruments, and sound recording. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.)

RE-103 • Religion and Culture • 4 • Thomas Davis
An introductory study of the nature of religion, the interaction of religion and culture, and the function of religious belief in the life of the individual. Consideration will be given to such phenomena as myth and ritual, sacred time and space, mysticism, evil, conversion, and salvation. Readings will be drawn from classical and modern sources. Note(s): (Fulfills humanities requirement.)

SO-101 • Sociological Perspectives • 3 • Philip Lewis
The basic concepts and principles of major sociological perspectives. Attention is given to how these perspectives have been developed and used by social scientists to explain social phenomena. Recommended as an introduction to the discipline. Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)

TH-304 • Theater Performance • 3 • Lary Opitz
Students will train with and perform with The Saratoga Shakespeare Company, a professional theater with an Actors' Equity contract. Students will be cast in roles in a production and will rehearse for a two week period and then perform in the production for twelve performances over two weeks. Training will involve techniques in Shakespearean acting, stage movement and combat, vocal work and career preparation. Students are eligible to join the Actors' Equity EMC (Equity Membership Candidate) program and will accrue four points towards Equity membership. Requires permission of instructor.

TH-305F •  Theater Production• 3 • Lary Opitz 
Students will be involved in various aspects of production and/or arts management with The Saratoga Shakespeare Company, a professional theater with an Actors' Equity contract. Students will have a variety of opportunities to train and work in the areas of scenic construction, sound reinforcement, stage management, costume construction, arts management, and career development throughout the two week rehearsal period and the two week performance period. Requires permission of instructor.

 

 

Summer Session 3: May 30 - August 4, 2017

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

CH-221 • Organic Chemistry I • 5 • Kara Cetto Bales  
The structures, physical properties, reactivity, and reaction mechanisms of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons are investigated. The lab introduces the student to synthesis, purification, and chemical and spectroscopic methods of characterizing organic compounds. Note(s): Three hours of lecture-discussion and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: CH-106, CH-107H, or CH-125.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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